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Are European universities about to take a bite out of UK student recruitment?

Published on: Author: Mark Murphy Leave a comment

By Sarah St. John– In the news this month, we read of UCAS opening up to European universities so that students can also apply overseas via the online system alongside their UK applications. This news will have pulled opinions in two directions, with some fearing a brain drain as students are attracted to the lower tuition fees… Continue reading

Tackling educational inequity: between and beyond school improvement

Published on: Author: Mark Murphy 1 Comment

By Chris Chapman Traditionally, we have focused on change within schools. This has delivered some returns: at worst – tactically ratcheting up test scores at the expense of capacity building and at best – increasing schools’ capacity to manage change for the longer term. In addition, improving the learning level is crucial and within-school approaches… Continue reading

INNOVATION CREATION OR ‘SAME OLD SAME OLD’: PROPOSALS FOR EDUCATIONAL EQUITY IN 2015 PARTY POLITICAL PROPOSALS

Published on: Author: Mark Murphy Leave a comment

  By Jacqueline Baxter– The summary of the education policy proposals policies of the five main political parties reveals the weighting each places on social justice and the importance of creating a democratic, equitable education system. But on closer investigation, are the proposals new or are we seeing same old, same old wheeled out for 2015 and will… Continue reading

Evidence for setting in schools – stone, scissors, paper?

Published on: Author: Mark Murphy Leave a comment

By Dr. Elspeth McCartney- ‘Setting’, grouping children with others of similar attainment, perhaps changing groups across curriculum areas, is widely-used in classrooms. This post is not about the de/merits of setting, but the forms of evidence used to justify and contest it. In September The Guardian (3.11.14) announced the English Education Secretary’s intention of making setting virtually… Continue reading

The Crisis in Adult Education

Published on: Author: Mark Murphy 1 Comment

  By Paul Stanistreet- It won’t grab many headlines, even in the specialist education press, but there is a growing crisis in adult participation in education and training, with stark implications both for our economy and our democracy. If the trend continues it will soon be necessary to reinvent from scratch a part of the… Continue reading

Education needs a broader definition of literacy

Published on: Author: Mark Murphy Leave a comment

By Cristina Costa – Literacy was, still is and will continue to be a core mission of education. The ‘popular’ meaning of ‘being literate’ has usually been associated with the notion of being able to read and write; a fundamental skill to prevail in a society in which the written word has a massive impact… Continue reading

Advancing ‘race’ and ethnicity in educational research

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By Oscar Odena and Richard Race. There is a prevailing sense that the term ‘race’, used in the past to highlight difference based on perceived ability and temperament, is no longer acceptable. ‘Race’ issues appear to be currently off the policy agenda, subsumed into ‘social justice’, ‘inclusion’ and ‘ethnicity’ topics. However ‘race’ is still a… Continue reading

Owen, music and inclusion

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By Oscar Odena. Robert Owen’s vision of education for all outlined the importance of arts education for personal development as well as for community cohesion. His vision of education comprised not just reading and writing but aesthetic appreciation, music and dancing, in order to achieve everybody’s holistic development and a sense of inclusion. His New… Continue reading

Exploring the impact of academy chains in England

Published on: Author: guwebteam 5 Comments
teenage school pupils

The Robert Owen Centre for Educational Change at the University of Glasgow has been working with colleagues at the University of Southampton to explore the impact of academy chains in England. This work builds on earlier work exploring the impact of federations on student outcomes (Chapman and Muijs, 2013) and qualitative studies of academy chains… Continue reading

Knowledge is the route to emancipation: Lawrence Stenhouse on teacher work

Published on: Author: Mark Murphy 1 Comment

[image (c) Todd Berman] By Clive Dimmock Since joining the Robert Owen Centre I am experiencing constant resonances with the work of a man I have admired for most of my 30-year university career. If you espouse these – teachers researching their own practice, action research, use of data to inform improved practice, the centrality… Continue reading